Food Profiles

Introduction

Helen Allingham
Helen Allingham

It’s no secret that a diet rich in vegetables, fruits and healthy proteins is good for us! The saying “you are what you eat” really couldn’t be more true! While learning about herbalism, it’s impossible to not also look at our regular diet and wonder how the chemicals, nutrients and micronutrients of the bulk of the food we eat play a role in our overall health. Everyday, we make a choice to eat nutrient dense foods or processed sugary foods. This effects us not only on a physical level but a mental and emotional one as well. More and more, science is showing us how connected our body systems are and the critical role that our diet and lifestyle play in keeping illness at bay. We may be predisposed for certain conditions, but our lifestyle can often be an epigenetic trigger turning on a genetic switch that could have remained off.

Alfred John Billinghurst
Alfred John Billinghurst

Naturally, most of us would probably desire to live not just a relatively long life but a healthy one. As the medical industry has improved, so has life expectancy for the most part over the last one hundred years. Unfortunately, for many of us, the quality of life has not improved. We are living longer but with chronic and debilitating disease and that’s not any way to truly live and enjoy our valuable time. When we suffer from disease it effects not only ourselves but our families and the wider world when we have less energy and time to give to those we love or charitable causes. Believe it or not, it’s never been easier to grow our own food from home. I’ve highlighted a lot of permaculture and edible landscaping foods that once you get started, will typically be very low maintenance that I truly believe anyone is capable of growing! 

Each food will have an introduction and history as well as interesting facts, its benefits with cited evidence based studies, methods of use and considerations, how to grow and harvest successfully as well as at least one easy recipe. Visit the section about “Plant Allies” to read about the collective use of both herbs and food to ward off specific ailments.

You may be interested to also read: (Coming soon…)

Easiest Permaculture Plants to Grow

Easiest Container Plants to Grow

● Each topic links back to my patreon account where access hinges on a minimum monthly donation of $1 a month through paypal. Please bear with me while this list is under construction and evolving. 

● No statements here are aimed to diagnose or treat any illness. I’m not a doctor. I’m not a homeopath. I’m not suggesting use of any specific herb or food to cure any specific diagnosis or illness. I’m simply an herbalist, who has organized and shared information about herbs, food, scientific studies and culinary recipes that are otherwise publicly available. Many herbs and foods in general interact negatively with medication and independent research and discussions with our doctors are critical. Remember that often, and out of necessity, scientific studies go where the financial support exists. Perspective and context is important. Many studies may be biased based on financial interest, were conducted on animals and not on humans as of yet or have a small sample size. Most medicinal herbs and some foods are not recommended during pregnancy or nursing due to lack of sufficient studies.

● As a general reminder, where we get our herbs or food is incredibly important. It’s best to grow our own but when we can’t, it’s important to make sure we’re purchasing from sustainable and cultivated sources. Many plants are suffering from over harvesting or increased disease caused by mass production.

● Everything here is my original written words and not to be copied or reproduced without my permission. Thank you for respecting my time, years of research and work that went into herbalism and the capability of being able to share it with you.


Acai Berry

Almond

Apple

Apricot 

Artichoke

Aruglula

Asparagus

Avocado

Banana

Beets

Bell Peppers

Blackberry

Blueberry

Brazil Nuts

Broccoli

Brussel Sprouts

Butternut Squash

Cabbage

Cantaloupe

Carrot

Castor Oil

Cauliflower

Cherry

Chia Seeds

Chlorella

Coconut

Collard Greens

Corn

Cranberry

Cucumber

Daikon

Dark Chocolate

Dragonfruit

Flax Seeds

Goji Berry

Grape

Grapefruit

Guava

Hazelnut

Hemp

Kale

Kiwi

Leek

Lemon and Lime

Lentils

Mandarin

Mango

Mushroom

Oat

Olive Oil

Onion

Orange

Papaya

Peach

Pear

Peas

Pineapple

Pomegranate

Pumpkin

Quinoa

Rasberry

Rhubarb

Seaweed

Spinach

Spirulina

Sprouts

Strawberry

Sunflower Seeds

Sweet Potato

Swiss Chard

Tomato

Turnip

Walnut

Watermelon

Wheatgrass